RSS

Monthly Archives: September 2011

Market Capitalization Inequality in the Steve Jobs era

The excellent analyst website asymco.com recently published a post titled Visualizing the Steve Jobs era. In it they display an area chart of the relative size of market capitalization of about 15 companies they have tracked for the last 15 years.

Since I had looked at the Gini index of a similar set of companies in an earlier post on Visualizing Inequality I contacted the author Dirk Schmidt. Thankfully he shared the underlying data. From that I calculated the Gini index for every quarter and overlaid a line chart with their area chart.

Share of Market Capitalization Area Chart overlaid with Gini Index

Dirk elaborated in his post and identified three distinct periods in his post:

  • Restructuring of Apple 1997-2000 – Gini remains very high near 0.85 due to MSFT dominance
  • iTunes era 2001-2006 – Gini decreases to ~ 0.55 due to AAPL increase and taking share from other established players
  • Mobile devices era 2007-2011 – Gini increases again to 0.65 due to increasing dominance of AAPL and irrelevance of smaller players

Regardless of the absolute value of the Gini index – note the caveat from the earlier post that it is very sensitive to the number of contributors – the trend in the Gini can be an interesting signal. One company dwarfing every other like a monopoly corresponds to high Gini (here 0.85 due to MSFT dominance). A return to lower Gini values (here down to ~0.5) signals stronger competition with multiple entrants. The recent reversal of the Gini trend (up to 0.65 due to AAPL dominance) is a sign that investors see less choices when it comes to buying shares in those tech companies. Whether that’s a leading indicator for consumers seeing less choices in the marketplace is another question…

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 29, 2011 in Financial, Industrial

 

Tags: , , ,

Fractals

While browsing the web for some Mathematica resources I came across Paul Nylander’s website on Fractals and other computer-created illustrations. Amazing stuff! Here are just a few images from his website. He has lots of information and often source-code with the images as well. Go check it out.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 27, 2011 in Art, Scientific

 

Tags: ,

Visualizing Inequality

Visualizing Inequality

Measuring and visualizing inequality is often the starting point for further analysis of underlying causes. Only with such understanding can one systematically influence the degree of inequality or take advantage of it. In previous posts on this Blog we have already looked at some approaches, such as the Lorenz-Curve and Gini-Index or the Whale-Curve for Customer Profitability Analysis. Here I want to provide another visual method and look at various examples.

Inequality is very common in economics. Competitors have different share of and capitalization in a market. Customers have different profitability for a company. Employees have different incomes across the industry. Countries have different GDP in the world economy. Households have different income and wealth in a population.

The Gini Index is an aggregate measure for the degree of inequality of any given distribution. It ranges from 0.0 or perfect equality, i.e. every element contributes the same amount to 1.0 or the most extreme inequality, i.e. one element contributes everything and all other elements contribute nothing. (The previous post referenced above contains links to articles for the definition and calculation of the Gini index.)

There are several ways to visualize inequality, including the Lorenz-Curve. Here we look at one form of pie-charts for some discrete distributions. As a first example, consider the distribution of market capitalization among the Top-20 technology companies (Source: Nasdaq, Date: 9/17/11):

Market Cap of Top 20 Technology Companies on the Nasdaq

Apple, the largest company by far, is bigger than the bottom 10 combined. The first four (20%) companies – Apple, Microsoft, IBM, Google – are almost half of the entire size and thus almost the size of the other 16 (80%) combined. The pie-chart gives an intuitive sense of the inequality. The Gini Index gives a precise mathematical measure; for this discrete distribution it is 0.47

Another example is a look at the top PC shipments in the U.S. (Source: IDC, Date: Q2’11)

U.S. PC Shipments in Q2'11

There is a similar degree of inequality (Gini = 0.46). In fact, this degree of inequality (Gini index ~ 0.5) is not unusual for such distributions in mature industries with many established players. However, consider the tablet market, which is dominated by Apple’s iOS (Source: Strategy Analytics, Date: Q2’11)

Worldwide Tablet OS shipments in Q2'11

Apple’s iOS captures 61%, Android 30%, and the other 3 categories combined are under 10%. This is a much stronger degree of inequality with Gini = 0.74

To pick an example from a different industry, here are the top 18 car brands sold in the U.S. (Source: Market Data Center at WSJ.COM; Date: Aug-2011):

U.S. Total Car Sales in Aug-11

When comparing different the Gini index values for these kinds of distributions it is important to realize the impact of the number of elements. More elements in the distribution (say Top-50 instead of Top-20) usually increases the Gini index. This is due to the impact of additional very small players. Suppose for example, instead of the Top-18 you left out the two companies with the smallest sales, namely Saab and Subaru, and plotted only the Top-16. Their combined sales are less than 0.4% of the total, so one wouldn’t expect to miss much. Yet you get a Gini index of 0.49 instead of 0.54. So with discrete distributions and a relatively small number elements one risks comparing apples to oranges when there are different number of elements.

Consider as a last example a comparison of the above with two other distributions from my own personal experience – the list of base salaries of 30 employees reporting to me at one of my previous companies as well as the list of contributions to a recent personal charity fundraising campaign.

Gini Index Comparison

What’s interesting is that the salary distribution has by far the lowest amount of inequality. You wouldn’t believe that from the feelings of employees where many believe they are not getting their fair share and others are getting so much more… In fact, the skills and value contributions to the employer are probably far more unequal than the salaries! (Check out Paul Graham’s essays on “Great Hackers” for more on this topic!)
And when it comes to donations, the amount people are willing to give to charitable causes differs immensely. We have seen this already in a previous post on Gini-Index with recent U.S. political donations showing an astounding inequality of Gini index = 0.89. I challenge you to find a distribution across so many elements (thousands) which has greater inequality. If you find one, please comment on this Blog or email me as I’d like to know about it.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on September 22, 2011 in Industrial, Scientific, Socioeconomic

 

Tags: , ,

Bit.ly link analysis on half-life of web content

The team at URL-shortening website Bit.ly has posted an interesting analysis on the attention span to links shared on the Internet via different social media platforms. This provides some quantification to what some have termed internet impatience. Most shared web links experience an initial burst of attention immediately after publication followed by a steep decay to near-zero relative activity. A useful measure is a link’s half-life, defined as the time interval between its peak frequency and half of the rest of all clicks over its lifetime.

From the Bit.ly Blog:

So we looked at the half life of 1,000 popular bitly links and the results were surprisingly similar. The mean half life of a link on twitter is 2.8 hours, on facebook it’s 3.2 hours and via ‘direct’ sources (like email or IM clients) it’s 3.4 hours. So you can expect, on average, an extra 24 minutes of attention if you post on facebook than if you post on twitter.

Distribution of web link half-lifes (Source: Bit.ly Blog)

This half-life distribution plot (x-axis 1 day = 86.400 seconds) of content shared via bit.ly links shows some interesting patterns:

  • In general, content half-life is about 3 hours (10.000 sec)
  • Content half-life does not depend on the medium through which it is shared
  • YouTube content has a different distribution and a considerably longer half-life (about 7 hours)

One is tempted to relate such stats to one’s own browsing experience or look at systematic analysis of how people deal with shared links. For example, Microsoft’s Outlook team did extensive usability research on how people deal with incoming email so as to improve the usability of their mail reader. It was found that most emails fall into one of three categories (Open & Read immediately, Ignore & Discard, File & Flag for future reading). I speculate that bit.ly links received in Twitter or email will be similar, perhaps with the added category of retweet or forward (in the case of a story going viral). YouTube being different can perhaps be attributed to the fact that many videos require more time so we make a more deliberate decision as to whether and when we want to spend that time. For instance, one might say I want to watch this video tonight when I get home from work, which would fit with the 7 hours half-life.

In any event, such statistics show us that when it comes to clicking on shared links, our behavior is fairly predictable and probably driven by simple habits rather than complex thought. On one hand this allows good estimates for the expected life-time clicks. On the other hand, it can be a bit disconcerting to realize that our clicking behavior may be controlled by rather simple behavioral drivers (habitual classification, desire for instant gratification, out-of-sight out-of-mind, etc.). For instance, we usually give the most recent incoming news priority over other criteria of personal content preference. But is the latest really the greatest? I suspect that just like impulse-shopping there is a lot of impulse-clicking. And who does not know the exhausted feeling of getting lost while browsing and in hindsight regretting not having made the best use of one’s time… Perhaps this hints at more opportunities for more personalized and content-preference filtered news delivery mechanisms (such as the News reader app Zite, recently acquired by CNN).

 
1 Comment

Posted by on September 9, 2011 in Scientific, Socioeconomic

 

Tags: , ,

Inequality, Lorenz-Curves and Gini-Index

In a previous post we looked at inequality of profits and the useful abstraction of the Whale-Curve to analyze Customer Profitability. Here I want to focus on inequality and its measurement and visualization in a broader sense.

A fundamental graphical representation of the form of a distribution is given by the Lorenz-Curve. It plots the cumulative contribution to a quantity over a contributing population. It is often used in economics to depict the inequality of wealth or income distribution in a population.

Lorenz Curve (Source: Wikipedia)

The Lorenz-Curve shows the y% contribution of the bottom x% of the population. The x-axis has the population sorted by increasing contributions; (i.e. the poorest on the left and the richest on the right). Hence the Lorenz-Curve is always at or below the diagonal line, which represents perfect equality. (By contrast, the x-axis of the Whale-Curve sorts by decreasing profit contributions.)

The Gini-Index is defined as G =  A / (A + B) , G = 2A  or G = 1 – 2B

Since each axis is normalized to 100%, A + B = 1/2 and all of the above are equivalent. Perfect equality means G = 0. Maximum inequality G = 1 is achieved if one member of the population contributes everything and everybody else contributes nothing.

An interesting interactive graph demonstrating Lorenz-Curves and corresponding Gini-Index values can be found here at the Wolfram Demonstration project.

The GINI Index is often used to indicate the income or wealth inequality of countries. The corresponding values of the GINI index are typically between 0.25 and 0.35 for modern, developed countries and higher in developing countries such as 0.45 – 0.55 in Latin America and up to 0.70 in some African countries with extreme income inequality.

GINI index of world countries in 2009 (Source: Wikipedia)

Graphically, many different shapes of the Lorenz-Curve can lead to the same areas A and B, and hence many different distributions of inequality can lead to the same GINI index. How can one determine the GINI index? If one has all the data, one can numerically determine the value from all the differences for each member of the population. An example of that is shown here to determine the inequality of market share for 10 trucking companies.
Another approach is to model the actual distribution using a formal statistical distribution with known properties such as Pareto, Log-Normal or Weibull. With a given formal distribution one can often calculate the GINI index analytically. See for example the paper by Michel Lubrano on “The Econometrics of Inequality and Poverty“. In another example, Eric Kemp-Benedict shows in this paper on “Income Distribution and Poverty” how well various statistical distributions match the actually measured data. It is commonly held that at the high end of the income the Pareto distribution is a good model (with its inherent Power law characteristic), while overall the Log-Normal is the best approximation.

After studying several of these papers I started to ask myself: If x% of the population contribute y% to the total, what’s the corresponding GINI index? For example, for the famous “80-20 rule” with 20% of the population contributing 80% of the result, what’s the GINI index for the 80-20 rule?

To answer this question I created a simple model of inequality based on a Pareto distribution. Its shape parameter controls the curvature of the distribution, which in turn determines the GINI index. The latter is visualized as color-coded bands using a 2D contour plot in the following graphic:

GINI index contour plot based on Pareto distribution model

The sample data point “A” corresponds to the 80-20 rule, which leads to a GINI index of about 0.75 (strongly unequal distribution). Data point “B” is an example of an extremely unequal distribution, namely US political donations (data from 2010 according to a statistic from the Center of Responsive Politics recently cited by CNNMoney):

“…a relatively small number of Americans do wield an outsized influence when it comes to political donations. Only 0.04% of Americans give in excess of $200 to candidates, parties or political action committees — and those donations account for 64.8% of all contributions”

0.04% contribute 64.8% of the total! Here is another way of describing this: If you had 2500 donors, the top donor gives twice as much as the other 2499 combined. This extreme amount of inequality corresponds to a GINI index of 0.89 (needless to say that this does not seem like a very democratic process…)

As for US income I created a separate graphic with data points from the high end of the income spectrum (where the underlying Pareto distribution model is a good fit): The top 1% (who earn 18% of all income), top 0.1% (8%), and top 0.01% (3.5%).

GINI Index Contour Plot with high end US Income distribution data points

These 3 data points are taken from Timothy Noah’s “The United States of Inequality“, a 10-part article series on Slate, which in turn is based on data and research from 2008 by Emmanuel Saez and visualizations by Catherine Mulbrandon of VisualizingEconomics.com. This shows the 2008 US income inequality has a GINI Index of approximately 0.46, which is unusually high for a developed country. Income inequality has grown in the US since around 1970, and the above article series analyzes potential factors contributing to that – but that’s a topic for another post. In the spirit of visualizing data to create insight, I’ll just leave you with this link to the corresponding 10-part visual guide to inequality:

Postscript: In April 2012 I came across a nice interactive visualization on the DataBlick website created by Anya A’Hearn using Tableau. It shows the trends of US income inequality over the last 90 years with 7 different categories (Top x% shares) and makes a good showcase for the illustrative power of interactive graphics.

 
6 Comments

Posted by on September 2, 2011 in Financial, Industrial, Scientific, Socioeconomic

 

Tags: , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: